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THE JOURNAL OF FEMALE
URINARY INCONTINENCE


Poster Section
 
 

Is there a correlation between pelvic floor muscle strength
and female sexual dysfunction?

Gameiro MO*; Miraglia LS*; Muchailh RC*; Souza VO*; Baldacin DC**; Amaro JL***
Botucatu Medical School(BMS) – São Paulo State University (UNESP)
* Physiotherapist  ** Medical student  ***Urogynecologist

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The standardization of pelvic floor (PF) muscle strength in nullipara as a predictive factor for urinary and sexual dysfunction is greatly relevant. However, such a correlation is still not well established1.
PF muscle hypotonia may play a significant role in female sexual disorders2.

OBJECTIVE: To correlate subjective and objective PF muscle strength with the presence of orgasm.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fifty healthy nulliparous women with mean age of 23 years were studied. Personal data and clinical history were obtained, as well as  information about sexual activity, such as pain during intercourse and satisfaction degree. PF vaginal palpation was performed (Figure 1), and the classification system of Amaro3(Table 1) was used. PF perineometry with an inflatable vaginal probe (Figure 2) was performed during 3 contractions sustained by the longest period possible in supine with legs extended (P1), bent-knee supine (P2), sitting (P3), and standing (P4) (Figure 3).

 

Parameters assessed

Incidence

Regular physical acitivity (3x/week)

58%

Intestinal Obstipation

54%

Sexual activity

84%

Orgasm present

82%


RESULTS:
No correlation between vaginal palpation and the presence of orgasm was observed in 76% of the women studied (p<0.05). Perineometry performed in 4 different positions did not correlate with the presence or absence of orgasm (p>0.05) (Table 2).

CONCLUSION:
No correlation of subjective and objective pelvic floor muscle strength with orgasm was observed.
 
 
 
 

REFERENCES

  1. Rosenbaum TY. Pelvic floor involvement in male and female sexual disfuction and role of pelvic floor reabilitation in treatment: a literature review. J Sex Med.2007;4 (1): 4-13.
  2. Beji NK, Yalcin O, Erkan HA. The effect of pelvic floor training on sexual function of treated patients. Int Urogynecol J. 2003; 14: 234-38.
  3. Amaro JL, Gameiro MOO, Padovani CR. Treatment of urinary stress incontinence (SUI) by intravaginal electrical stimulation (IES) and pelvic floor physiotherapy.         Int. Urogynecol. J., v. 14, p.204-8, 2003.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Figures

Figure 1.
Vaginal palpation
.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Figure 2.
Dynamed  Perineometer.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Figure 3.
P1, P2, P3 and P4 positions.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tables

Table 1.Vaginal palpation classification system described by Amaro and collaborators in 2003.

Degree

Digital palpation

0

Absence of  muscle contraction

1

Mild contraction

2

Moderate contraction – not sustained for more than 6 seconds

3

Normal contraction – sustained for more than 6 seconds

Amaro, 2003

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Table 2. Correlation between perineometry and orgasm.

Orgasm   

Present 
Absent

P1

19,06

14,81

P2

17,33

17,57

P3

25,09

15,87

P4

33,87

35,37