When the subjective, visual pelvic floor muscle strength evaluations were performed, 74.5% (38/51) of the incontinent group and 100% of the continent group presented contraction. There was no significant difference between the groups (Table 2).
In the palpation evaluation, 9.8% (5/51) of incontinent women had no muscular contraction, 37.3% (19/51) showed recognizable muscular contraction, 35.3% (18/51) showed muscular contraction supported for less than 5 seconds, and 17.6% (9/51) showed supported contraction for more than 5 seconds. In the continent group, 6% (3/50) showed recognizable muscular contraction, 8% (4/50) showed muscular contraction supported for less than 5 seconds, and 86% (43/50) presented supported contraction for more than 5 seconds. This demonstrates that continent women have higher perception and strength of the pelvic floor (Figure 1).
Comparing muscular strength with urine loss, we noted that the continent group presented higher pelvic floor muscular strength than the incontinent group; mean peak contraction 38.4cm H2O and 26.1cm H2O, the mean of the mean supported contraction was 28.1cm H2O and 15.4cm H20, the mean duration of contraction was 11.8 and 8.9 seconds (Table 3), for continent and incontinent respectively. Differences were statistically significant between the groups (p<0.05).